Home / Blog / Article


January 8 2010

Tearing Down The Architect’s Claims

Nicole Kurokawa Neily

On the Cato Institute blog, Dan Mitchell cleans Karl Rove's clock for his Wall Street Journal column which attacked Obama over spending. I believe the phrase that might apply here is "pot, meet kettle."

Writes Mitchell:

After all, he was the top adviser to President Bush and the federal budget exploded during Bush's eight years, climbing from $1.8 trillion to more than $3.5 trillion. More specifically, Rove was a leading proponent of the proposals that dramatically expanded the size and scope of the federal government, including the no-bureaucrat-left-behind education bill, the two corrupt farm bills, the two pork-filled transportation bills, and the grossly irresponsible new Medicare entitlement program.

Not surprisingly, Rove even tries to blame Obama for some of Bush's overspending, writing that "...discretionary domestic spending now stands at $536 billion, up nearly 24% from President George W. Bush's last full year budget in fiscal 2008 of $433.6 billion. That's a huge spending surge, even for a profligate liberal like Mr. Obama." This passage leads the reader to assume that Obama should be blamed for what happened in fiscal years 2009 and 2010, but as I've already explained, the 2009 fiscal year started about four months before Obama took office and 96 percent of the spending can be attributed to Bush's fiscal profligacy. Yes, Obama is now making a bad situation worse by further increasing spending, but he should be criticized for continuing Bush's mistakes.

Rove then has the gall to complain that Obama is "...growing the federal government's share of GDP from its historic post-World War II average of roughly 20% to the target Mr. Obama laid out in his budget blueprint last February of 24%." Yet a quick look at the budget data shows that the burden of federal spending jumped from 18.4 percent of GDP when Bush took office to more than 25 percent of economic output when he left office. Even if the (hopefully) temporary bailout costs are not counted, Bush and Rove are the ones who deserve most of the blame for today's much larger burden of government. It should be noted, by the way, that none of the new spending under Bush was imposed over his objection. He did not veto any legislation because of excessive spending.

Downsizing the prior president's spending pattern to one of fiscal responsibility would have been change I could believe in. Alas, it doesn't look like that's the change we'll get.

IIndependent Women's Forum is an educational 501(c)(3) dedicated to developing and advancing policies that aren’t just well intended, but actually enhance people’s freedom, choices, and opportunities. IWF is the sister organization of the Independent Women’s Voice.​
Follow us