June 28 2013

Fracking: Evidence-Smevidence

Vicki E. Alger

Recall back in 2011 when the EPA released a non-peer reviewed report that linked hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to contaminated wells in Pavillion, Wyo.? At the time then-EPA administrator Lisa Jackson acknowledged there has never been a proven case of fracking affecting water.

The study was supposed to have been peer reviewed by now, but after numerous delays the EPA has decided to just come clean and say it’s not gonna happen. Investor’s Business Daily calls the EPA deception a cover-up, adding:

At the time, Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead called the study 'scientifically questionable,' an opinion buttressed by the facts and the EPA's announcement on Thursday that it will not produce a final report or have outside experts review its claims of environmental harm. It told its story two years ago and is sticking to it. The story is bogus.

First, the contamination was found in two 'monitoring wells' drilled by EPA outside of town, not in water wells that actually supply residents their water. …

What the EPA report doesn't say is that the U.S. Geological Survey has detected organic chemicals in the well water in Pavillion for at least five decades, long before fracking was done. The deepwater wells that EPA drilled are situated near a natural gas reservoir. …

The fact is the mixture used to fracture shale and extract oil and gas is a benign blend of 90% water, 9.5% sand and 0.5% chemicals such as the sodium chloride of table salt and the citric acid of the orange juice you had for breakfast. …

OPEC would like nothing better than to see the EPA shut down fracking entirely, and the EPA would like to comply as part of the Obama administration's war on the fossil fuels it regards as the energy source of the past.

Which is why the agency is not about to allow a scientific peer-review of its bogus claims about Pavillion.

Apparently, the Obama administration is hoping the public will be distracted by the President’s war on coal instead.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus