Home / Blog / Article




September 2 2019

10 Facts about Worker Satisfaction in the U.S.

by Patrice Lee Onwuka

Happy Labor Day!

As you relax at the pool or beach today you’re probably not thinking about work. Good! 

We are thinking about it at the Independent Women’s Forum because we know that your ability to find a good job and get the pay your worth is important.

We came across the results from a recent annual survey by business research experts, The Conference Board. They were encouraging. American workers are feeling confident about job security, wages, and more.

Take a look at these 10 facts about U.S. worker satisfaction:

  1. Almost 54 percent of U.S. employees feel satisfied with their jobs.

  2. 2017 to 2018 marks the second-biggest increase in U.S. workers' satisfaction in over three decades.

  3. Wage satisfaction rose a staggering 9.8 percent among young workers (aged 35 and under).

  4. Of 23 components of satisfaction, job security saw the biggest improvement, climbing by five percent from 2017.

  5. Workers are most pleased with their commute to work.

  6. The top five overall components of job satisfaction in order: commute to work, the people at work, interest in work, physical environment, and job security.

  7. People at work, workload, communication channels, and work/life balance are top drivers of job satisfaction for women.

  8. Wages, promotion policy, and bonus plan are the top drivers of job satisfaction among men.

  9. The top drivers for both genders are potential for future growth, communication channels, and recognition/acknowledgment.

  10. The five lowest components of job satisfaction in order: bonus plan, promotion policy, the performance review process, educational/job training programs, and recognition/acknowledgment.

Comparing what drives satisfaction among men and women is not surprising, but reinforces what we have always held: men are salary maximizers while women are flexibility maximizers.

As we think about public policies that are meant to help workers, we should recognize that men and women have different drivers. Policies that are meant to boost pay but limit flexibility may not be what women want. 





Independent Women's Forum is an educational 501(c)(3) dedicated to developing and advancing policies that aren’t just well intended, but actually enhance people’s freedom, choices, and opportunities. IWF is the sister organization of the Independent Women’s Voice.​
Follow us